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Creativity and the Law: Copyright, Censorship, Authorship, Publishing

A Graduate Student Colloquium at the University of Toronto

 

Saturday 21 January, 2006
Upper Library, Massey College
4 Devonshire Place (at Hoskin Ave., east of St. George)
9:15 a.m. – 4:45 p.m.

Program

Panels will feature papers by Canadian and U.S. graduate students on contemporary and historical aspects of the relation between art and law, and will also include special guest speakers

 

Keynote Speaker: Professor Ira Nadel (University of British Columbia)

 

Professor Laura J. Murray (Queen’s University)

C. Paul Spurgeon, LL.B., Vice President of Legal Services & General Counsel, The Society of Composers, Authors and Music Publishers of Canada (SOCAN)

Copyright and censorship are in flux. The acceleration of electronic communication has necessitated new legislation in jurisdictions around the world in order to improve the exchange of ideas. Stirring new currents into cultures and economies, the technological innovation has re-opened questions of central importance to society. What is the relation between creativity and the law? What is a fair definition of intellectual property? When does creativity become obscenity? How will governments legislate freedom of expression while still dealing with violence, hate literature and pornography? In so far as the law controls the circulation of cultural productions, it determines artists’ impact on their society; it is therefore crucial to investigate the connections between cultural productions and the legal and economic context out of which they arise.

The history of literature and the arts is rich with answers to these questions. Book historians consider them in relation to an economic and social conjuncture of intellectual, cultural, political, and legal spheres. The Toronto Centre for the Book and the students of the Graduate Collaborative Program in Book History and Print Culture at the University of Toronto invite you to join us as we explore historical backgrounds as well as current trends and their implications for artists, scholars, and their readers.

 

9:15

Registration (free)

   

9:45-11:00

Evolving Copyright

 

Trevor Cook (University of Toronto): “‘Our minds amidst our meat’: Intellectual Property in the Seventeenth Century.”

Eli MacLaren (University of Toronto): “Smiles v. Belford: Towards a History of Copyright and Authorship in Canada.”

Nicholas Bradley (University of Toronto): “Culture and Copyright in Robert Bringhurst's Haida Translations.”

   

11:15-12:45

Evaluating Copyright

 

C. Paul Spurgeon (SOCAN): “Copyright Law and the ‘Digital Economy’: Threats and Opportunities.”

Laura J. Murray (Queen's University): “Fair Dealing and Academic Freedom: Use It or Lose It.”
[Professor Murray maintains a must-read Web resource on copyright. [See http://www.faircopyright.ca/.]

Matthew Rimmer (Australian National University): “Google: Infinite Library, Copyright Pirate, or Monopolist?”

   

12:45-1:50

Lunch
   

2:00-3:00:

Keynote Address

 

Ira Nadel (University of British Columbia): “Copyright, Empire and The Politics of Print.”

   

3:15-4:45

Republic and letters

 

Dale Barleben (University of Toronto): “Judging Ulysses: Censorship and Evidence in the Trials of ‘One Book’.”

David Roh (University of California, Santa Barbara): “Navigating Public Space, Property Rights, and Ownership in Adventures of Huckleberry Finn.”

Alexandre Lefebvre (Johns Hopkins University): “The Life of the Law: Oliver Wendell Holmes and Adjudicative Creativity.”

Event sponsored by the Toronto Centre for the Book and the Collaborative Program in Book History and Print Culture

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